Deepest Genealogy possible! The GenoGraphic project!

Investigating the origin of the Dubbelman family, brought me the opportunity of researching the origin of myself so far as to leaving Africa with Adam.
The research is possible by analysing the DNA of a person. The Genographic project makes this possible by buying a kit to collect a sample of your DNA. You sent this to the research lab and follow your pakkage by the NationalGeographic website.

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All the Dubbelman men from the pedigree of Michiel share Haplogroup R1B (M269) with each other. my Y-chromosome results identify myself as a member of haplogroup R1b. The genetic markers that define my ancestral history reach back roughly 60,000 years to the first common marker of all non-African men, M168, and follow my lineage to present day ending with M343, the defining marker of Haplogroup R1b. Some in this lineage also carry the markers P25 (R1b1),M73 (R1b1b),M269 (R1b1c),M153 (R1b1c4),M167 (R1b1c6), and M222 (R1b1c7).If you look at the map highlighting my ancestors' route, you will see that members of haplogroup R1b carry the following Y-chromosome markers:M168 > M89 > M9 > M45 > M207 > M173 > M343

Today, roughly 70 percent of the men in southern England belong to haplogroup R1b. In parts of Spain and Ireland, that number exceeds 90 percent.
What's a haplogroup, and why do geneticists concentrate on the Y chromosome in their search for markers? For that matter, what's a marker?Each of us carries DNA that is a combination of genes passed from both our mother and father, giving us traits that range from eye color and height to athleticism and disease susceptibility. One exception is the Y chromosome, which is passed directly from father to son, unchanged, from generation to generation.

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